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27 january 2021

blog post on the Young World Federalists website argues, “The Earth, once initially filled with abundant resources and space for life, has been divided into factions separated by invisible barriers, in a system that keeps us divided and working against each other. … If we look at the way the world is and conclude that coexisting with each other is not truly possible, it will be true only because that is what we have convinced ourselves of.” But while world peace “may be an idealistic goal…it is a goal we can strive for. To start, however, we have to have a strong system between all the nations of Earth, consisting of nations that coordinate and cooperate with each other to deal with disasters that threaten people across the Earth, from war and terrorism to climate change and natural disaster.”

Calin Trenkov-Wermuth and Paul M. Bisca of the United States Institute of Peace argue in an analysis that for the new Joseph Biden Administration in the United States, “domestic priorities will be front and center on the agenda. Preventing state fragility and violent extremism abroad may seem less urgent.” But they say the Global Fragility Act “should remain a top priority. Successfully advancing the GFA would directly benefit U.S. national security and help establish a more values-driven foreign policy. To this end, the United States should work with allies to create a global architecture for security sector assistance built on principles of aid effectiveness adapted from development financing.”

Association of World Citizens President Rene Wadlow writes about the legacy of historian Stringfellow Barr, who “served as president of the Foundation for World Government from its start in 1948 to its closing in 1958. He was president of St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland. …The aim of St. John’s; under Stringfellow Barr was to turn out well-read liberals who would have studied a common set of ‘Great Books‘ starting with the Greeks such as Plato.” Barr published Let’s Join the Human Race in 1950.

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